The Columbus Dispatch reported that Harry E. Yruegas, caregiver at the Heinzerling Developmental Center on the West Side admitted to raping a 47-year-old, severely disabled female patient at the nursing facility.  Yruegas pleaded guilty to one count each of rape and sexual battery for the assault, which was witnessed by another employee who walked into the patient’s room.  The co-worker told police that she walked into the woman’s room and saw Yruegas on the woman’s bed “with his penis exposed”.  Three employees of Heinzerling reported inappropriate behavior by Yruegas with the patient on three other dates.

The victim has “profound mental retardation” and other debilitating conditions and is unable to walk or speak, Assistant Prosecutor Jennifer Rausch told the judge.

In an interview with police, Yruegas referred to the patient as “super cute” and admitted that he had fondled her before the other employee walked in.  He also told officers that he had engaged in sexual conduct with the patient on several other occasions.

 Yruegas was indicted for eight counts of rape and eight counts of sexual battery, with most of the counts based on his interview with police.

 

 

KSPR reported on a proposal to keep residents safe, and to deter theft, fraud, and abuse, by allowing video cameras in Missouri nursing homes.  Under the proposed law, families can choose to put a camera in their patient’s room, at their own expense and would be able to view the cameras at any time.

Supportive lawmakers say families could monitor how much and how often medications are given and how their loved one is being taken care of overall. Rep. Andrew McDaniel backs the bill after his staff says they received hundreds of complaints about abuse, neglect, rape and fraud.

Nursing home lobbyists claim they are concerned about patients’ privacy, and their lobbyists have killed similar bills in past legislative sessions. However, McDaniel says the camera can be turned off during baths or if a patient is exposed.

 

Cleveland.com reported that Edward McShaffrey was sentenced to 18 months in prison for sexually abusing a nursing home resident and will be classified as a tier I sex offender. The designation will require him to register with the local sheriff every year for 15 years.

A jury found McShaffrey guilty in December 2016 of gross sexual imposition. The sentence is the maximum allowed for this particular crime.   McShaffrey was a licensed practical nurse at Brookdale Montrose Nursing Home. McShaffrey was seen with his mouth on the 69-year-old’s breast, according to a news release from the prosecutor’s office.

 

McKnight’s reported the tragic case of Johnny Lee Bryant who was admitted to Doctors Hospital in Augusta, GA, in early January 2015  from The Place, a nearby long-term care facility. He was treated at the hospital for sepsis and pneumonia until Jan. 15, 2015, when he was discharged.  Bryant was transported by Gold Cross EMS to a nursing home in Bainbridge, GA — a city 300 miles away. Once there, the nursing home refused to admit Bryant, the Augusta Chronicle reported. He died in February 2015.

His sister is suing the hospital, physician and ambulance service accusing the hospital, the ambulance company and Hetal Thakore, M.D., of negligence, wrongful death and causing emotional distress.

Advanced Senior Care had an article about the five biggest complaints nursing home residents have and there is no surprises.

#1: No one coming when the call bell is pressed

#2: The food

#3: The patient lift

#4: Nighttime disturbances

#5: There’s no one here for me to talk to

 

Twin Cities reported the arrest of David Erwin DeLong, nursing home employee, for felony criminal sexual conduct after he was accused of sexually assaulting a 78-year-old resident with advanced Alzheimer’s disease at Heritage House in Pequot Lakes.

The criminal complaint outlines the witness statement and DNA evidence gathered to make the case that DeLong sexually assaulted the 78-year-old woman in May 2016. The woman is nonverbal, wheelchair-bound and unable to feed herself, requiring round-the-clock care, the complaint stated.

A co-worker interrupted DeLong committing what she believed was a sexual assault. The staff member said she was the only other person working in the building at the time, and wanted to leave for a cup of coffee between 9:15 and 9:30 p.m. She went to find DeLong to tell him, and noticed the door was closed to the room he was in. She tapped on the door a few times, waited a second or two, and then opened the door.

Inside, the staff member said the resident was lying on her side in a fetal position with her backside positioned outward, naked from the waist down. DeLong stood several feet away sweaty and out of breath, the staff member said, jumping up and down attempting to pull up his pants and underwear. DeLong allegedly turned around and looked at his co-worker, said “I,” but then stopped, shaking his head before turning his back.

The staff member told the officer she was so shocked, she didn’t know what to do. She closed the door and immediately reported what she saw to a nursing staff member working in the next building. That staff member contacted the director of the facility, who directed him to bring DeLong into the office for a conference call. DeLong allegedly denied the allegations during the phone call, and was sent home.

The resident was transported to Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Brainerd to undergo a sexual assault exam. While preparing the woman for transport, it was discovered she was wearing a different nightgown than the one the staff member observed when she walked in on DeLong. Staff later located the nightgown and a mattress pad from the resident’s bed washed in the washing machine, and all on-duty staff denied placing the items there.

The remaining bedding, clothing and underwear worn by the victim were gathered and sent to the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension for analysis, along with the sexual assault exam kit completed at the hospital.

In June, the BCA issued a preliminary report, indicating semen was identified on swabs taken from the victim as part of the sexual assault exam. In August, the lab issued a final report, which indicated DeLong’s DNA profile matched the one found in the victim’s exam.

 

 

Hall of Fame magazine reported on the abuse at Winters Park Nursing Home.  Minnie Graham is 98 year old and living in Winters nursing home in Texas. One day, she told her family that one of the staff abused her.  The family became suspicious and more concerned when they found black eyes and bruises on Minnie’s face. The nursing home caregivers said that Minnie had fallen out of her wheelchair several times.

The family set up a hidden camera to find out for themselves what was really going on.  What the family saw terrified them.

One of the Winters Park Nursing Home workers, who was identified as Brenna Tiller, was caught on camera, hitting Minnie. She was also cursing and mocking at the elderly woman. While Minnie was screaming in pain, Tiller sprayed water to her face and placed a towel on her mouth. The towel that Tiller put on Minnie’s mouth was the one she used to clean the old woman’s body.

Another worker, who goes by the name Louis, was also caught on camera hitting Minnie. He also punched the old woman.

Louis was arrested while Tiller was convicted for felony with 5 years of probation.

News 12 Long Island reported the arrest of three caregivers from a Uniondale nursing home for neglect that led to the death of a patient.  The state attorney general says two nurses and a nurse’s aide at A. Holly Patterson Extended Care Facility neglected an 81-year-old by ignoring the ventilator alarm (after it got disconnected somehow) for at least 9 minutes–enough time for him to suffocate and die.

Experts say there is a condition called “alarm fatigue” that sometimes causes nurses and other health care professionals to miss the sound of alarms.

The Chicago Tribune reported that two social workers, Kenneth Allen and Olufunmibi Ogunyipe, allege they were fired from Burnham Healthcare now known as Bria of River Oaks nursing home after refusing to fabricate medical records related to incidents of patient abuse.  Some of their patient-abuse allegations were investigated separately by the Illinois Department of Public Health, which cited the facility for safety violations, records show.

The nursing home has withstood years of state citations for violence, patient neglect and filth. Last year it received $16.5 million from Medicaid and Medicare while reporting $1.38 million in profits.  Records show that some of those federal health-care dollars went to Weinfeld’s uncle, nursing home magnate Morris Esformes, whose son and close business partner, Philip Esformes, is being held without bond in a Miami federal detention cell on charges that he orchestrated a $1 billion Medicaid kickback scheme in Florida.

Allen alleges that a supervisor told him to falsify the medical chart of a female resident who was hospitalized in 2012 with facial bruises and black eyes. Allen believes the woman was beaten by a fellow resident, but he was told to write that she had fallen. A state inspection report later found that the facility failed to properly investigate her family’s complaint that she was assaulted.

Allen alleges that after he documented a resident’s rape complaint, a supervisor ripped Allen’s report out of the medical file and tore it up. The state health department inspection concluded the facility had failed to thoroughly investigate the sexual assault allegation and to notify authorities.

Ogunyipe alleges that, in the case of a 60-year-old resident who had repeatedly requested a discharge, a supervisor told him in 2013 to write up medical notes falsely stating that Ogunyipe had tried repeatedly to transfer the man but couldn’t find a program with an open bed. A state health department inspection cited the facility for failing to assist the resident’s request for a discharge.

Ogunyipe alleges that a supervisor tried to deceive state inspectors by removing disheveled residents who might trigger state scrutiny because they appeared neglected. A supervisor gave him $30 to $50 to take the residents out of the building, buy them cigarettes, feed them at a McDonald’s and claim they were going on a field trip, saying: “They can’t be in the building,” the suit states.

Ogunyipe said that the administration wanted to conceal residents with untrimmed hair and soiled clothes because “you would know that they were not being cared for.”

He witnessed fellow employees entice residents back to their rooms with a cigarette or snack, then punish them. “They would just close the door and — boom, boom, boom! Deal with the resident. Beat him up. Spit on his face and then walk out, close the door,” Ogunyipe said.  (A 2012 state inspection report said two residents alleged guards beat or roughed them up in separate incidents. The report says that at least one guard at the home was fired as a result.)

WCCB Charlotte reported the tragic assault of a resident suffering from dementia by police with tasers.  When the incident happened in March, the sheriff made excuses defending the police by claiming the resident assaulted another resident and was resisting officers when they tried to get him to a doctor’s appointment.  The police body cam video shows the man waving his hands near the officers. When he attempted to walk away, the deputy tased him.  The family says the man died two months after the tasing, and believes his death is connected with what happened.  See more info at WWLP.