One of the worse situations we investigate as a nursing home abuse and neglect lawyer in South Carolina is physical abuse by caregivers and resident to resident altercations. Violence and mistreatment between nursing home residents is a common occurrence, according to experts.

In a 2014 study of nursing homes, Cornell University researchers Karl Pillemer and Mark Lachs determined that resident-to-resident elder mistreatment affected nearly 20 percent of residents over a four-week period. Researchers concluded that people who typically engage in resident-on-resident abuse are cognitively disabled to some degree but physically capable of moving around.

Specific types of mistreatment included verbal incidents, such as cursing, screaming or yelling at another person (16 percent); physical incidents, such as hitting, kicking or biting (5.7 percent); and sexual incidents, such as exposing oneself, touching other residents or attempting to gain sexual favors (1.3 percent).

Their underlying dementia or mood disorder often can manifest itself as verbally or physically aggressive behavior, the study found.

In 2015, nursing and residential care facilities were also among the industries with the highest prevalence of nonfatal occupational violence, with a rate of 6.8 per 100 full time workers, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

One study revealed that nursing assistants at facilities with special units for Alzheimer patients had a significantly high risk for assault injuries and human bites. Thirty-five percent of nursing assistants reported physical injuries caused by aggression from residents, and 12 percent reported experiencing a human bite within the previous 12 months while working.

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