WoodTV had an interesting article about Illuminate HC which took over management of SKLD and 10 other Michigan nursing homes a year ago. Of SKLD’s 11 homes, four have one-star ratings (much below average), four have two-star ratings (below average), two have three-star ratings (average), and one has a four-star rating (above average).

Brandee Davis has been complaining about the care and treatment of her mother for months. Davis, whose mother lives at SKLD nursing home in Wyoming, has filed formal complaints with the state twice since May.

“It’s really hard to watch someone you love with all your heart suffer… beg for help, beg to leave,” Davis said in an interview.

SKLD has a one-star rating on the federal website medicare.gov, a score that’s described as “much below average.” Of the 25 licensed nursing homes in Kent County, SKLD is one of just three with a one-star rating.

Davis is going to court in September to try to get guardianship over her mom, Michele, so she can move her.

“I shouldn’t have to keep calling and reporting,” Davis said. “My mom shouldn’t have to call me, begging me to call the home because her call light has been on for two hours and nobody’s coming to her room.”

Among Davis’ complaints to the state is that SKLD workers failed to answer her mom’s call light or change her diaper for hours; ran out of appropriately-sized briefs, thus forcing her to wear too-small briefs which ripped her skin; left her in the same clothes for five days and placed an aggressive dementia patient into her room despite her inability to protect herself.

“They decided to place a known violent dementia patient… in a room with an incapacitated adult who can’t do anything for herself,” Davis said.

State investigators who inspect nursing homes on behalf of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services substantiated several of Davis’ complaints, including the one about her mom’s new roommate, who was moved to another room after she “went through (Davis’ mom’s) things … smacked her legs” and attacked staff, bruising a nurse, according to a state report.

“Review of documentation and interviews, revealed (Davis’ mom) was vulnerable and unable to defend herself from (the dementia patient) who wanders, has physical behaviors and a history of blocking the doorway to the residents’ room so staff could not get into the room. Which placed (Davis’ mom) at higher risk of harm,” a state inspector wrote.

Inspectors issued statements of deficiencies and ordered the home to create plans of correction after their visits in late May and mid-July. Among the deficiencies cited were out-of-reach and unplugged call lights, residents left for hours in urine-soaked briefs and dirty rooms with “dried food and liquids stuck to the residents’ room floors, dirt and dust accumulating under the residents beds, tissues and papers accumulating on the floors.” One room had dust clumps “larger than golf balls” under the bed.

Davis said SKLD injured a helpless elderly person.

“It’s mind-blowing and traumatizing,” she said. “And when I was in there two days ago, they’re still using one person to change my mom and she can’t use her arms to stop, to protect herself. So if they roll her and she rolls to the other side, that’s going to be catastrophic.”

Davis’ biggest fear is that her mom will choke and be unable to call for help.

“She can’t really eat or swallow very well, so I always get worried she’s going to choke and she’s going to push her call light and no one’s going to get there in time,” she said.

 

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