Roughly 36% of skilled nursing facilities saw a drop in their overall star ratings after planned fixes to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Nursing Home Compare system took effect last month. About 16% of providers gained at least one star under the ratings overhaul.  Approximately 47% of skilled nursing facilities had no change in their overall rating, but slightly more lost one or more stars on the quality measure, Martin told SNN.

Roughly 48% of providers lost one or more stars in the quality domain, and that’s largely driving the decrease in overall stars.  A building’s five-star score consists of three separate metrics, each of which CMS also ranks from one to five: survey, quality, and staffing.

Staffing had taken center stage in CMS’s ratings overhaul, particularly after a New York Times investigation last summer revealed that operators may have been less than accurate in reporting nurse coverage information. Federal officials responded by slapping 1,400 facilities with one-star ratings on staffing.

Both the staffing measure and the survey measure are important, with survey having the most weight. Still, practically speaking, providers receive one standard survey a year. And improving staffing will require extra funds coming in from somewhere, as well as the effort of finding competent employees in a major workforce crunch.  Improving a SNF’s quality metrics, however, can begin much more quickly.

SNFs can also take steps to improve how they keep track of patients when they are discharged. Readmission penalties are assessed 30 days after hospital discharge, and so SNFs could be on the hook for any complications that arise after a patient leaves their care.

 

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