USA today reported that Phyllis Campbell, a nursing home resident with dementia and a history of wandering off, was outside in temperatures hovering around zero for about eight hours before staff members noticed she was missing and found her dead from hypothermia, a state investigation found.

The state’s findings say Campbell had wandered into the courtyard twice during the week before she died and that she got out of her room several times that day and said, “I’m going home.”

The woman told a nurse’s aide she was going home.  She went through a door into a courtyard even though she was wearing a monitor that should have set off alarms, the report said.  Tests later showed the sensors did not always work, the state’s report said. Staff members also told investigators the device didn’t always work.

Two aides told investigators they did not do scheduled checks that night even though they were marked as completed, according to the Ohio Department of Health investigation.  She was found in the courtyard about 30 feet from its doors the morning of Jan. 7.

The Times-Standard reported another wrongful death lawsuit against a Brius Healthcare Services-owned nursing home Granada Rehabilitation and Wellness Center.  The lawsuit involves the neglect of a resident which caused a build-up of fecal matter in her digestive tract so large that it resembled an “eight-month pregnant uterus” by the time it was removed in April 2017.  The nursing home failed to monitor dementia patient Jeannette Sharp’s bowel movements as was directed in her care plan or failed to notify a physician about her lack of bowel movements.

“The operating physicians captured 3-4 liters of fecal matter from Ms. Sharp’s colon with more spilling into her abdominal cavity,” court documents state. “Because of the severity of her fecal impaction, Mrs. Sharp died shortly after the surgery.”  The lawsuit stated the buildup of fecal matter occurred over a period of months and eventually blocked the exit from Sharp’s stomach.

“Jeannette was in excruciating pain yet was not provided pain relief,” Janssen Malloy’s first amended complaint states. “No one gave Ms. Sharp an enema or checked to see why her stomach was distended.”

This is a great example of how mismanagement and “related party transactions” affect the quality of care for nursing home residents.  Granada Rehabilitation and Wellness Center, Granada’s administrator Alice Brasier, Brius Healthcare Services, Brius’ related administrative company Rockport Healthcare Services, Brius CEO Shlomo Rechnitz and other companies associated with Rechnitz are named as defendants in the lawsuit, according to court documents.


Authorities say a 76-year-old woman found dead outside the Ohio nursing home where she lived died of hypothermia.

The Putnam County sheriff is investigating Phyllis Campbell’s death at the Hilty Home in Pandora, roughly 50 miles southwest of Toledo.

Campbell was found outside the facility on a Sunday morning, when temperatures around much of Ohio were still below freezing.

The sheriff’s office says an autopsy showed Campbell died from hypothermia. Authorities haven’t released details about what happened.

The facility is part of Mennonite Home Communities of Ohio, whose CEO said by email Wednesday that it’s grieving Campbell’s death and extending sympathies to her family. CEO Laura Voth says administrators are working with authorities to conduct a thorough investigation but can’t publicly discuss details of the case.

The Star Tribune reported on the tragic and preventable death of Delores Rowan.  Rowan suffocated and died on May 31, according to the Ramsey County medical examiner’s office. The woman’s injuries included fresh bruising on her neck, the autopsy found.  The facility is at fault for allowing Rowan’s head to become trapped between the mattress and the bed’s grab bar.

Langton Place, which is operated by Presbyterian Homes, “had no policy, procedure or system to ensure the proper sizing of mattresses, the fit of the grab bars [or the proper] space between the mattresses and the grab bar device to reduce the risk of entrapment,” according to a state Health Department report released last week.  The report said a nurse saw the resident on her back and asleep about 4 a.m. In a routine check 90 minutes later, the woman was discovered with her head wedged between the mattress and a grab bar. Resuscitation efforts failed.

Her husband, Michael Rowan, said that his wife’s suffocation “wasn’t the only problem we had with that place.”  Langton Place one day ran out of the liquid nutrition she was fed through a tube. He also said she came down with cellulitis, a bacterial skin infection, and needed to be hospitalized. He said he also found caked feces in his wife’s pubic area.

CBS Chicago reported on the tragic case of Letasha Mims who suffered from severe mental-health issues, including dementia, and ended up needing full-time care at Alden-Wentworth Rehabilitation.  Her mother, Mary Mims, says her daughter died after suffering repeated abuse and neglect at a nursing home. That same nursing home is facing nearly 90 lawsuits against it. Letasha died in 2014. What she went through is difficult for her mom to handle.

Mims says Letasha couldn’t speak or use her arms or legs, yet was repeatedly left in her own feces. Mims took pictures to document the alleged neglect, which she says resulted in bed sores and wounds.

“I’ve never seen a wound as bad as my daughter’s. It was all the way to the bone,” Mims says.

She says there were even bugs in her daughter’s bed and that Letasha went through drastic weight loss – Mims says because of starvation.

Letasha had a sexually transmitted disease and was treated for it but the facility failed to call police.  Mims says her 36-year-old daughter was nonverbal and incapable of giving consent to sex.  Because no rape kit test was done on the nursing home resident, there is no chance of ever catching the offender.



CNN had an article with a video showing a resident assaulting another resident for several minutes before staff intervened.  The video is tough to watch.  The beating, which was first reported by the Gainesville Sun, lasted on and off for nearly 2 minutes. The beating occurred October 3 in a secure unit of Good Samaritan, a 45-bed assisted living facility.  It occurred in a common area of a secured unit within the facility while other residents ate and watched television mere feet away. The video of a resident beating another resident raises new questions about the safety of the elderly in places meant to protect and care for them.

In the video, a 52-year-old resident is seen punching an 86-year-old resident with dementia more than 50 times as the older man lay curled up on the floor. The younger resident accused the older resident of eating his cupcake, according to law enforcement.  At the time the beating took place, there was no staff member attending to residents in the unit, and no one had been assigned to monitor the unit’s video surveillance, according to official reports.
The video was taken by the facility’s closed circuit surveillance system in October and later turned over to the police, who shared it with CNN.
The facility — the Good Samaritan Retirement Home in Williston — had a history of violations, and more sanctions in the past five years than any other assisted living facility in Florida. In December, two administrators were arrested in connection with separate incidents on charges of neglect of the elderly.  One of the facility’s administrators, Nenita Alfonso Sudeall, later broke down and cried as she told police she was “overwhelmed” at the facility, which she said was short-staffed and had poorly trained employees, according to a police report.
The elderly resident was hospitalized with bruising and swelling to his face, as well as hip pain, according to the police report.
Also earlier this year, a CNN report found that the federal government has cited more than 1,000 nursing homes for mishandling or failing to prevent alleged cases of rape, sexual assault and sexual abuse at their facilities between 2013 and 2016.
“There are far too many cases of abuse and neglect happening in nursing homes and assisted living facilities,” said Brian Lee, executive director of Families for Better Care, a national advocacy organization for residents and their families. “We’ve been seeing cases for decades. This one incident in Florida shows how bad the problem can be.”

Cleveland19 reported that Alice Ramsey pleaded guilty to patient abuse and reckless homicide in the death of an 85-year-old patient at the Hubbard Road Meadows Group Home in Madison.

Mary Srpan was injured in an incident at the group home on Jan. 3, 2017. She was brought to the Lake Hospital Madison Emergency Department and died on Jan. 17, 2017.  It has not been explained or released how Srpan was injured.

MSN reported the patient dumping by University of Maryland Medical Center.  The hospital’s security guards had just wheeled a patient to a bus stop, and in the freezing temperatures they left her there. The only thing she had on was a hospital gown. It’s called “patient dumping” and it doesn’t just happen in Baltimore. In 2007, “60 Minutes” investigated the practice of removing homeless patients from Los Angeles hospitals and leaving them downtown.

Imamu Baraka was walking past a Baltimore hospital when he noticed something he says he’ll never forget.

“It’s about 30 degrees out here right now,” Baraka says in a recording of the encounter. “Are you OK, ma’am? Do you need me to call the police?” he asks.  “Come on and sit down,” Baraka repeatedly says to the patient in the recording. “I’m going to call and get you some help.”

In a statement, the University of Maryland Medical Center said that they “share the shock and disappointment of many who have viewed the video. In the end we clearly failed to fulfill our mission with this patient.”

The man who recorded the video called 911, and says medics ended up taking the patient back to the same hospital. Now a review is underway that could lead to personnel action against the hospital employees involved.

The federal government is launching an effort to stop nursing homes from discharging residents illegally.

Discharges and evictions lead the list of complaints that state long-term care ombudsmen receive each year. In 2015, these advocates for nursing home residents received more than 9,000 such complaints.

In a memo to state officials, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), which oversees nursing homes, said it has begun an examination of this widespread problem and will explore ways to combat it.

States have the primary responsibility for policing the nation’s nursing homes, but state regulators have to at a minimum follow federal rules that list specific reasons a facility can legally evict a resident. A nursing home can force a resident to leave only if at least one of the following conditions is met:

  • The resident’s clinical or behavioral status endangers the safety of others at the facility. The reason most often reported for patients’ being discharged against their will is “behavioral, mental and/or emotional expressions” of distress, CMS says.
  • The resident’s care is not being paid for. This is another common reason for such forced discharges. This can happen when individuals who had been paying privately run out of resources and enroll in Medicaid, which reimburses nursing homes less than they receive from private-pay patients. It also happens when Medicare residents shift to being covered under Medicaid.
  • Transfer or discharge is necessary for the resident’s welfare and the facility cannot meet his or her needs. The CMS memo notes that a nursing home should determine whether it can adequately care for an individual before that person is admitted. Once someone becomes a resident, the memo says, “it should be rare” for that facility to later say it cannot meet that individual’s needs.
  • The resident no longer needs the services the nursing home provides.
  • The resident’s continued presence endangers the health of others at the nursing home.
  • The nursing home is closing.

Discharges that violate federal regulations “can be unsafe and/or traumatic for residents and their families,” the memo says, adding that nursing home residents are sometimes left homeless or hospitalized for months when they are evicted.


The National Memo reported on Trump’s plan to allow nursing homes to neglect and abuse vulnerable elderly resident to the point of death and not be subject to a fine.  Reacting to the demands of lobbyists and their campaign contributions, the Trump administration has struck down several regulations that increase the safety and well-being of residents. The New York Times reports that this now means several common citations that used to result in fines will either see reduced penalties or no penalties at all.

“The fines, designed to prod nursing homes into treating elderly Americans with more care, respect, and dignity, were put in place by President Barack Obama and sought to make the institutions answerable to standards put together by Medicare.”

According to federal data, CMS since 2013 has cited nearly 6,500 nursing homes for serious violations discovered during inspections required under Medicare and has fined about two-thirds of those facilities. The nursing homes were most commonly cited for bedsores, failing to protect patients from avoidable accidents, mistreatment, and neglect, Kaiser Health News reports.

The News-Gazette reported the lawsuit filed against the Champaign County Nursing Home in connection with the death of Sonya J. Kington, a 78-year-old Alzheimer’s resident who died of hyperthermia after being left unsupervised outside the home.  According to an investigation by the coroner’s office, video footage from inside the nursing home appeared to show Ms. Kington entering the courtyard at 1:47 p.m. It isn’t until about 5:15 p.m. that staff members are seen searching for her.

Her limp body was found in an exterior courtyard on a hot day when the high temperature reached 87 degrees.  At the time she was found in the courtyard, Ms. Kington was lying in direct sunlight, her skin was “very hot to touch” and she had vomit on both sides of her mouth.  Ms. Kington’s death was caused by hyperthermia brought on by exposure to hot weather.

The suit alleges that the nursing staff at the nursing home “failed in their duty to provide the necessary services and treatments to prevent the death of Ms. Kington in failing to properly secure the facility and in failing to properly supervise Ms. Kington.”