New York Magazine had an article on Trump’s lack of response to the opioid crisis.  His indifference is killing people.  Since taking office, Trump has put far more effort into promoting policies that would exacerbate the opioid epidemic than into ones that would mitigate it.

“The year Donald Trump was elected president, drug overdoses killed 63,600 Americans. That was 21 percent more drug deaths than America had seen in 2015, which had been the worst year for such fatalities in our nation’s history. It was also more unnatural deaths than gun violence, HIV/AIDS, or car accidents had ever caused in the United States in a single year. The scale of devastation wrought by the opioid epidemic was so vast, life expectancy in the United States fell for the second consecutive year — the first time that had happened since the early 1960s.”

The death toll will grow in 2017, according to preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  If the use of synthetic opioids like fentanyl continues to grow at its current rate, Stat News forecasts that more than 650,000 Americans will die from drug overdoses over the next decade.  In 2015 alone, the opioid crisis cost the American economy $504 billion, according to the White House Council of Economic Advisers.

“The drug-overdose crisis is concentrated in white, rural America (a.k.a. Trump Country). And on the campaign trail, the GOP nominee pledged to make ending the drug crisis a top priority of his administration. But since taking office, he has put far more effort into promoting policies that would exacerbate the epidemic than into ones that would mitigate it.”

“The president has tried to pass trillion-dollar cuts to Medicaid, one of the top sources of funding for addiction treatment in the United States; called for reducing spending on preventative anti-drug measures; proposed slashing the budget for the Office of National Drug Control Policy by 95 percent; neglected to nominate anyone to lead the Drug Enforcement Agency; declined to implement the vast majority of his own opioid-commission’s recommendations; declared the opioid crisis a “public health emergency” — but refused to ask for a single penny in additional funding to combat the crisis, even as he called on Congress to add $1.5 trillion to the deficit for the sake of cutting taxes; and put Kellyanne Conway, a career pollster and pundit — with no experience in public health — in charge of his administration’s opioids agenda.”

• Lawmakers “who have been leaders on opioid policy,” like West Virginia senator Shelley Moore Capito, “haven’t seen outreach from Conway or her cabinet.”

• One of the few people working on Trump’s “public education campaign” is “Andrew Giuliani, Rudy Giuliani’s 32-year-old son, who is a White House public liaison and has no background in drug policy.”

• The office’s big idea for combating the drug-overdose crisis is a “just say no”–style ad campaign, which would have premiered during the Super Bowl broadcast, if Conway’s staff hadn’t failed to put it together in time.

There is a long list of evidence-based reforms that he could implement to save thousands of Americans from its ravages. To take just one example, the most effective remedy for opioid addiction, bar none, is medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Under MAT, addicts are provided with methadone and buprenorphine — less powerful opioids that satiate most addicts’ cravings, and arrest their withdrawal symptoms, without inducing heroin’s debilitating, euphoric high. Decades of research, the World Health OrganizationCDC, and National Institute on Drug Abuse have all demonstrated MAT’s efficacy. Some studies suggest that the treatment reduces mortality among drug addicts by more than 50 percent. And yet, the therapy is only available in about 10 percent of America’s conventional drug-treatment facilities.

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