The Anderson Independent Mail had two articles on national for-profit nursing home chain Orianna.  See articles here and here.  Orianna Health Systems is a Tennessee-based company that runs 13 Upstate nursing homes, more than any other provider.

One article discussed the quality of care issues at Orianna’s facilities in Greenville where residents complained that staff members were slow to respond to call lights; some reported waiting 50 minutes for requested pain medication without receiving it, according to the inspection report. A resident interviewed that afternoon said “call lights often yield no response and sometimes the resident must yell or shout for assistance.”

Another resident complained that staff members “seem upset that you rang your bell and they tell you to wheel yourself around,” according to the report, which also listed nine grievances that had been filed between March and August about slow responses to call lights.  Citing the failure to respond to call lights in a timely manner, the inspection report found that the nursing home had not provided care “that keeps or builds each resident’s dignity and respect of individuality.”

Linville Court at Cascades Verdae was one of three Upstate nursing homes where inspectors found a number deficiencies that exceeded state and national averages between April 5 and Aug. 25, according to the most recent records from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

A total of 12 deficiencies were found at Greenville Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center, according to a July 19 inspection report. Eight deficiencies were found at The Arboretum at the Woodlands nursing home in Greenville, according to a May 4 inspection report.

One of the deficiencies at Greenville Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center involved a January incident in which a certified nursing assistant verbally abused a resident. The nursing assistant later resigned, according to the inspection report.

Another deficiency listed in the inspection report involved the nursing home’s failure to adequately address a 22-pound weight loss by a resident during a six-week period. The nursing home was also cited for a medication error rate of 11.1 percent, which is more than twice the acceptable rate.

The inspection report cited numerous environmental problems at the nursing home, including the presence of flies in the kitchen and other areas. The report said a resident was seen swatting files with a wash cloth in an activity/dining room.

Other deficiencies included a failure to provide proper treatment to prevent bed sores or heal existing bed sores and a failure to store, cook and serve food in a safe and clean way, according to the inspection report.

A state inspector also visited The Arboretum at the Woodlands in June in response to a complaint. According to the inspection report, a staff member was found asleep in the nursing home’s living room during an 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. shift on May 25.

Mikki Meer, chief operating officer for Orianna Health Systems, said in an email that her company “is proud of the continued improvement demonstrated in the recent survey results of its South Carolina facilities.”

Meanwhile the second article explains why the quality of care at Orianna’s nursing homes has gone down.  Orianna has serious financial problems as a result of mismanagement and the siphoning of funds to the corporate owner’s pockets.  Orianna has now fallen behind on lease payments for its facilities to Omega Health Investors, a Maryland-based healthcare real estate investment trust.

Taylor Pickett, Omega’s CEO, reported that since 2014, the occupancy rate at Orianna’s facilities has declined from 92 percent to 89 percent and expenses have grown by 6 percent while revenues increased only 2 percent.

As recently as July, Orianna was operating 48 skilled nursing facilities with 5,000 total beds in 11 states, according to the company’s website. The latest version of the website says the company is now managing 43 skilled nursing facilities with a total of 4,500 beds in seven states.

  • Nine of Orianna’s homes agreed to pay $4.46 million to settle lawsuits involving the deaths of 20 residents. That total includes three settlements adding up to $752,500 that were approved after last year’s name changes.
  • Inspectors found at least 525 deficiencies at the company’s Upstate nursing homes, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The deficiencies included instances of neglect, possible cases of abuse that were not investigated and medication errors, as well as failures to eliminate hazards, properly prepare meals and treat residents with dignity. The most dangerous deficiencies resulted in 26 fines totaling nearly $495,000.
  • The company’s nursing homes were responsible for 47 percent of the inspection-related deficiencies and 49 percent of fines at Upstate nursing homes. Orianna’s facilities account for 38 percent of the overall nursing home beds in the region.

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