Press of Atlantic City wrote an article discussing the dismal record of New Jersey nursing homes. Seven New Jersey nursing homes received the lowest quality ratings from the federal government last year based partly on state inspections in 2009 and 2010. Inspection reports show that residents in the worst-rated homes live in dirty conditions, endure verbal and physical abuse, and are neglected.

Hundreds of violations of rules that govern quality of care, safety and sanitation were found by inspectors during the past two years at the 60 nursing homes in Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland and Ocean counties. The reports are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to develop consumer ratings of one to five stars for nursing homes. The majority of area facilities – 65 percent – are rated three stars or lower, federal data show, and half are in the bottom two levels.

A review of more than 1,800 pages of New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services inspection reports from 2009 through April 2011 for 10 nursing homes showed that residents are routinely found living in dirty conditions, endure verbal and physical abuse, and are subject to neglect. Other violations include staff giving out the wrong medications, residents being strapped into wheelchairs and ignored for hours, theft, untreated infections, falls resulting from fragile residents being left unattended, and fire- and building-code violations.

State reports provide details of problems found during inspections. Some residents live in fear of reprisal if they complain about conditions.

A recurring theme was a failure to investigate or report incidents of abuse. Another recurring problem was failure to properly administer medication.  The medication error rate is not supposed to exceed 5 percent. A November inspection found an 18 percent error rate at South Jersey Extended Care. Our Lady’s Residence had a 14 percent error rate. Lincoln Specialty Care was at 9 percent, and Arcadia was at 8 percent. In one case at South Jersey Extended Care, a resident was supposed to get morphine every three hours for rectal pain, but went days without it because there was none.

A nurse and an aide allegedly told a resident who wanted help getting out of bed frequently overnight that she could not get up before 4 a.m. The inspection report states the staffers threatened to take away her wheelchair, withheld snacks and threatened to keep her in bed longer if she complained. The report states the resident shook in fear in the presence of the nurse and aide.

There are 367 nursing homes in New Jersey charging an average of $250 per patient per day, said Paul Langevin of the Health Care Association of New Jersey, a trade group of 185 homes.  Most homes are for-profit businesses run by companies that have multiple facilities. Costs of more than $90,000 per patient per year are often paid through Medicare and Medicaid, so tax dollars pay much of the bill.

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